[ Navigation Menu - Click these links to go to other pages on our website. ]
[ Home ] [ Garlic Overview ] [ 70 Varieties ] [ Growing Garlic ] [ Cooking Garlic ] [ Preserve Garlic ] [ Garlic Pills, Etc. ] [ Health Benefits ] [ Garlic Chemistry ] [ FAQs ] [ About Us ] [ How to Order ]
Red line.
[ Buy Garlic Here ] [ Artichoke Garlic ] [ Asiatic Garlic ] [ Creole Garlic ] [ Porcelain Garlic ] [ Purple Stripe Garlic ] [ Rocambole Garlic ] [ Silverskin Garlic ] [ Turban Garlic ] [ Buy samplers Here ]
Red line.
[ Our Online Farmers Market ] [ Grow Garlic in the South, CA & Texas ] [ Tour our Garlic Garden ] [ Paint Rock Pictographs ] [ Newsletter ] [ Garlic is Life ] [ Good Growers Wanted ] [ Spring 2007 ]

Gourmet Garlic Gardens logo

- Rocambole Garlics -

Picture of Rocambole garlics

Buy flavorful cold winter hardneck Rocambole garlics below for fall shipment
Rocambole Garlics Table of Contents
[ Click these links to go to items on this page. ]


[ An overview of Rocambole garlics ] [ Amish ] [ Bavarian ] [ Caretaker ] [ Carpathian ] [ Celeste ] [ Easy Peel ] [ German Giant ] [ German Red ]

[ Italian Easy Peel ] [ Italian Purple ] [ Killarney Red ] [ Korean Red ] [ Paw Paw ] [ Russian Red ] [ Slovenian ] [ Spanish Roja ] [ Ukraine ]


Caricature of a garlic bulb.


Welcome to our Online Catalog.
Five ways to buy from the growers in our Farmers Market:

1. - If you know the name of the garlic you want to buy,
click here look it up in an alphabetical listing and click on the name of the one you want.
or
2. - If you don't know the name of the garlic you want to buy,
click here look it up in a list sorted by mild, medium and hot/strong
and click on the name of one that sounds good to you.
or
3. - If you just want a sampler assortment
click here buy a sampler assortment of several varieties.
and click on the name of one that sounds good to you.
or
4. - Click here to go to our farmers market and click on the picture
of a grower you feel good about and buy from them.
or
5.- Call Bob at (325) 348-3049

Order now for fall shipment.


Caricature of a garlic bulb.

We now include an online garlic farmers market where you buy direct
from each farmer - just like at your local farmers market. Click Here to meet the growers.




Caricature of a garlic bulb.

- Rocamboles - the Gourmet Garlics With the Taste You Remember. -

- Be Somebody - Eat Gourmet Garlic. -

Picture of some Rocambole garlics.

Rocambole garlics tend to have thinner bulb wrappers than other hardnecks and lots of purple striping and splotches. They are not as white as other hardnecks and have a brownish cast to them, in fact, some of them almost look as though they need a bath. What they lack in beauty, they make up for in taste. Other rocamboles have sharp, vivid colors that alert the consumer to their strong, rich and deep flavor. Many people consider them their favorite garlics because of their very rich taste.

In the spring they send up a scape (stalk) that forms a complete double loop. (They're the only garlics that do a double loop.) They have usually seven to nine cloves arranged in circular fashion about a central scape and have few or no smaller internal cloves.

They do not grow well in warmer climates. They require a colder winter and a cooler spring than we have in most states south of Ohio. Warm winter denizens can and should buy them to eat because they're great.

Their primary drawback, other than being fussy about growing conditions, is that they are among the shortest storing garlics of all, storing 5-6 months from harvest and seldom storing beyond New Years Day. Even though they have a short shelf life, they are excellent for slicing and dehydrating and will store for years once dehydrated and kept dry and the slices can be ground into an excellent garlic powder that is so good, you won't ever want to buy grocery store garlic powder again. Another way to preserve them is to pickle them as they make fabulous pickled garlic that gets better every year for about five years. For more information about preserving garlic: Click here to go to our Preserving Garlic webpage

They more than make up for any of their shortcomings with their flavor.

Did I mention flavor? Their flavor must be experienced to be believed - its depth is remarkable. They have a deep earthy muskiness about them that few other garlics have and most are fiery when eaten raw though there are a few mild ones.

Back to Rocambole Garlics Table of Contents



Rocambole garlics we have available this year:




Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Amish - A rich, hot, strong Rocambole Garlic

Picture of garlic

Know where your food comes from - Buy Direct from our Growers below and Save.

Rocamboles grow better in cold winter gardens.

Harvests early-mid summer - stores through fall into winter.

Amish Rocambole may be an heirloom garlic, who knows? (a garden plant whose lineage can be traced for a 100 years or more) It was grown in Wisconsin and comes to us from Gale Waege and Keene Organics. It is a generally a vigorous grower with large foliage that is dark green and results in a pretty good sized bulb. Being a Rocambole garlic, its flavor is very strong, hot and spicy and sticks around for a long time. From a growers perspective, it grows well in cold winter areas, but does poorly in warm winter areas, and usually grows healthy fairly uniform sized bulbs. It has thin bulb wrappers that have a lot of purple and brown in them.

I have a hard time deciding which hot garlic should be ranked where, but Amish Rocambole is certainly up there and I will just have to continue eating as many different ones as I can in an effort to improve. When I die, don't bother to bury me, just plant in the fall and water me, I'll probably sprout and grow.

Amish Rocambole usually has anywhere from 8 or 9 easy to peel cloves that are of good size, with no smaller inner cloves. The outer bulb wrappers are thin and flake off easily so it is not a very good storer, but no Rocambole is - through the fall and into winter. Great taste is their claim to fame, not long storage. For those up North who want to grow their own garlic it only takes a year or two to grow all you can eat. It harvests in early summer along with most of the other Rocamboles. Bulbs are usually over 2 1/2 inches in diameter and are of good size are grown primarily for their particularly rich flavor.


Order Amish (Rocambole) from these growers now for shipping in the fall.

Picture of harvested garlic bulbs hanging in a barn. Picture of Keene Organics family.

Click on their pictures to buy from them.

Back to Rocambole Garlics Table of Contents







Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Bavarian -

Picture of Bavarian, a Rocambole garlic

A rich, musky Rocambole hardneck Garlic from Keene Organics

Harvests early in summer - stores into mid-winter.

- Order now for shipment in the fall.

A delicious Rocambole that stores longer than most Rockies.

Bavarian is an early harvesting, richly flavored fairly pungent garlic that grows well in cold winter areas. In addition to being early harvesting, it is very easy peeling and stores long enough to be planted in the fall but not much longer. Grows consistently large bulbs with large cloves

Bavarian ranks 7-9 on the garlickiness scale and 7-8 on the pungency side. Good strong Rocky. It has a very rich, musky, earthy flavor with a healthy bite, if what I taste tested last year was its normal taste.

Caricature of a garlic bulb.

None of the growers in our farmers market currently have this cultivar for sale. If you grow this cultivar organically and wish to sell it in our online farmers market, please email me.bob@web-access.net

Back to Rocambole Garlics Table of Contents







Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Picture of beautiful Rocambole garlics.

Caretaker

Caretaker is a big, robust, strong, full flavored, hardy, hardneck garlic. If you grow Porcelains or other later harvesting, longer storing garlics, you should also be growing this early harvesting hardneck and saving the longer storing ones for later. Grows well in most areas of the USA.

Taste test - Wow! I bit a chunk out of a clove of Caretaker and sat back to see what life would be like for the next minute and at first it was very light and crisp and rather shallot-like similar to Ukraine in taste but no apparent hotness until it came on with astonising suddeness and all I could do was to sit there with my mouth agape as if in a trance until the hotness passed about 30 seconds later leaving me with a warm rich shallot-like aftertaste that took a few minutes to dissipate.

Usually harvests in early summer and stores into mid winter at room temp.

-- Order now for shipment in the fall.

Picture of Eric Himelick's family

Back to Rocamboles Table of Contents







Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Carpathian (Polish)

Picture of garlic

Rocamboles grow better in cold winter gardens.

Harvests early-mid summer - stores into mid-winter.

- May be available this year. -

Carpathian came from the mountains of the same name in Southeast Poland and is sometimes called Polish Carpathian. It is a generally good sized though not a particularly large garlic. Being a Rocambole garlic, its flavor is very strong, hot and spicy and sticks around for a long time.

From a growers perspective, it grows well in cold winter areas and usually grows healthy surprisingly uniform sized bulbs. It has thin bulb wrappers that have a lot of purple and brown in them along with some reddish-orange veins.

Carpathian usually has anywhere from 8 or 9 easy to peel cloves that are of good size, with no smaller inner cloves. The outer bulb wrappers are thin and flake off easily so it is not a very good storer, but no Rocambole is. For those up north who want to grow their own garlic it only takes a year or two to grow all you can eat. It harvests in mid-season but a little later than most of the other Rocamboles. Bulbs are usually over 2 1/2 inches in diameter and are of good size are grown primarily for their rich flavor and good pickling capability.

Picture of Jeff and Billie Jean Westbrook of Gila Garlic.

Back to Rocambole Garlics Table of Contents







Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Picture of beautiful Rocambole garlics.

Celeste

Celeste may be the most unusual Rocambole in the USA today because it grows well in warm winter areas as well as throughout mid-America. All other Rocamboles grow only in the northernmost tier of States. I have even grown these well in central Texas a couple of times duringh hot dry years and they grew well and were of nice size but early high temps forced them to mature early so they did not get quite as big as they normally would have gotten.

These garlics were found growing in the 1970s on an old civil war battlefield over a hundred years after the battle north of present day Tulsa, OK. Through natural selection these garlics have become adapted to the area over the decades. Since it is a cold winter hardneck garlic, I speculate that it fell from the pocket of a Union soldier. In the Indian Territory of Oklahoma, tribal members of one persuation fought tribal members of the other persuation, splitting families and friends just like in the rest of the country.

Celeste is a big, robust, hot, strong flavored, hardy, Rocamble garlic. If you grow other later harvesting, longer storing garlics, you should also be growing this early harvesting hardneck that stores surprisingly long, especially for a Rocambole. Grows well in most areas of the USA.

The owner of the land, Terry Celeste, was the one who discovered them as runts and moved some to his garden and kept on growing them out and replanting the biggest and best until the fine big-bulbed strain we have today was developed. Since his name means heavenly and he viewed them as a gift from heaven, he named them Celeste.

Their taste is as as unusual as the fact that it grows in warmer winter areas in that it is sassy, slap your face hot and has distinct sub-flavors of hot mustard and Horseradish. It does not have the deep earthy muskiness nor does it have the heavy aftertaste that most Rocamboles have. Its taste is Truly as unique as this garlic itself is. If you are looking for a hot garlic with a unique personality, this one is for you.

Taste test - Wow! I bit a chunk out of a clove of Celeste and sat back to see what life would be like for the next minute or two and at it came on with astonising suddeness and just kept increasing in hotness and all I could do was to sit there with my mouth agape as if in a trance until the hotness peaked after about 30 seconds and slowly dissipated without leaving any aftertaste at all.

Rocamboles are not normally long storing garlics and usually harvest in early summer and store into winter at room temp. Terry Celeste says that his garlics usually store a year or more. Of course, we cannot guarantee that kind of storage but this garlic is so unusual that it would not surprise me to find that Celeste is a very long storing garlic.

Picture of beautiful Rocambole garlics.

-- Order now for shipment in the fall.

Buy direct from Terry Celeste in Oklahoma and save.
Click here to buy Celeste garlic now for shipment in the fall.
Picture of Celeste garlic


Back to Rocamboles Table of Contents







Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Picture of a Rocambole garlic.

German Giant, a hardneck Rocambole .

Harvests in early summer - stores into winter.

German Giant is a Rocambole that is prized not only for its size but for its deep rich musky, earthy garlickiness as well as a hot bite when eaten raw. German Giant is a subset of German Red (described next) that grows to very large size and that's good because you get more of a very good thing. If you like that warthy, musky strong hot flavor, German Red may be the best tasting garlic of all.

Rocamboles grow best in cold winter areas and store into mid-winter although German Giant stores longer than most Rocamboles.
It is best to also grow a long storing variety like Porcelain garlics along with Rocamboles and don't even start on the Porcelains until the Rocamboles are used up.

Order now for shipping in the fall. -


Order German Giant from these growers now for shipping in August and September 2013.

Picture of harvested garlic bulbs hanging in a barn. Picture of Kelly and Ben Ronniger in Idaho.

Click on their pictures to buy from them.


Back to this page's Table of Contents






Caricature of a garlic bulb.
German Red -

Picture of Rocambole garlic

A rich, musky Rocambole hardneck Garlic

Harvests early in summer - stores into mid-winter.

- Order now for shipment in the fall. -

Rocamboles grow better in cold winter gardens.

After ordering, use your back arrow key to return to this point.

Know where your food comes from. - Buy direct from our growers and save. -

German Red came to this country along with German immigrants a long time ago and I doubt if anyone knows where in Germany it originated. It is a generally a vigorous grower with large foliage that is dark green and results in a pretty good sized bulb. Being a Rocambole garlic, its flavor is very strong, hot and spicy and sticks around for a long time. It seems to have an especially rich taste. From a growers perspective, it grows well in cold winter areas and usually grows healthy fairly uniform sized bulbs. It has thin bulb wrappers that have a lot of purple and brown in them.

German Red usually has anywhere from 8 or 9 easy to peel cloves that are of good size, with no smaller inner cloves. The outer bulb wrappers are thin and flake off easily so it is not a very good storer, but no Rocambole is. For those up north who want to grow their own garlic it only takes a year or two to grow all you can eat. It harvests in mid-season along with most of the other Rocamboles. Bulbs are usually over 2 1/2 inches in diameter and are of good size are grown primarily for their particularly rich flavor.


Order German Red from these growers now for shipping in the fall.

Picture of Phil Greif of PD Farms with a newborn calf. Picture of Keene Organics family. Picture of Ted Ostheimer and wife.

Click on their pictures to buy from them.

After ordering, use your back arrow key to return to this point,
otherwise the secure shopping cart will return you to our home page.


Caricature of a garlic bulb.
Back to Rocambole Garlics Table of Contents







Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Italian Easy Peel

Picture of garlic

Rocamboles grow better in cold winter gardens.

Harvests in early summer - stores through fall into winter.

- We will probably have Italian Easy Peel this year. -

Italian Easy Peel is rare because of its incredible ease of peeling, thus its name. It is an Italian rocambole that was brought to the USA from Italy around a hundred years ago and has been grown all over Northern states ever since. It is thought to have come from northern Italy since it is a rocambole that probably won't grow well in southern Italy. Most other Italian garlics are artichokes and a few silverskins. When is the last time you remember an Italian rocambole?

Italian Easy Peel is generally good sized and can be a rather large garlic. Being a Rocambole garlic, its flavor is rich and strong, but unlike most Rocamboles its taste is milder rather than hot and spicy. A very enriching taste experience but not one to burn your tongue. For those who love garlickiness without the burn, it's for you.

From a grower's perspective, it grows well in cold winter areas and usually grows healthy uniform sized bulbs. It has thick bulb wrappers for a rocambole and they have a lot of purple and brown layered across a white background - very attractive.

Italian Easy Peel usually has anywhere from 8 or 9 easy to peel cloves that are of good size, with no smaller inner cloves. The outer bulb wrappers are thin and flake off easily so it is not a very good storer, but no Rocambole is.

For those up north who want to grow their own garlic, it seems to grow well in wet conditions. It only takes a year or two to grow all you can eat. It harvests in early summer along with most of the other Rocamboles and stores through fall into mid-winter so it's not a long storing garlic. Bulbs are usually over 2 1/2 inches in diameter and are of good size are grown primarily for their rich flavor and good growing characteristics.

Caricature of a garlic bulb.

None of the growers in our farmers market currently have this cultivar for sale. If you grow this cultivar organically and wish to sell it in our online farmers market, please email me.bob@web-access.net

Back to Rocambole Garlics Table of Contents







Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Italian Purple

Picture of Rocambole garlic

A rich, musky but mellow Rocambole hardneck Garlic.

- Order now direct from our growers below and save. -

Italian Purple

Rocamboles grow better in cold winter gardens.

Harvests in early summer - stores through fall into winter.

Italian Purple is rare because it is an Italian rocambole that was brought to the USA from Italy around a hundred years ago and has been grown all over Northern states ever since. It is thought to have come from northern Italy since it is a rocambole that probably won't grow well in southern Italy. Most other Italian garlics are artichokes and a few silverskins. When is the last time you remember an Italian rocambole?

Italian Purple is a generally good sized and can be a rather large garlic. Being a Rocambole garlic, its flavor is rich and strong, but not overly hot and spicy and sticks around for a while. A very enriching taste experience but not one to burn your tongue (at least not until the garlic is a little too mature). From a grower's perspective, it grows well in cold winter areas and usually grows healthy surprisingly uniform sized bulbs. It has thick bulb wrappers for a rocambole and they have a lot of purple and brown layered across a white background - very attractive.

Italian Purple usually has anywhere from 8 or 9 easy to peel cloves that are of good size, with no smaller inner cloves. The outer bulb wrappers are thin and flake off easily so it is not a very good storer, but no Rocambole is. For those up north who want to grow their own garlic, it is said to grow well in wet conditions. It only takes a year or two to grow all you can eat. It harvests in mid-season along with most of the other Rocamboles. Bulbs are usually over 2 1/2 inches in diameter and are of good size are grown primarily for their rich flavor and good growing characteristics.


Order Italian Purple (Rocambole) from these growers now for shipping in the fall.

Picture of  
Steve Wood and family from Penngate Garlic Farm Picture of harvested garlic bulbs hanging in a barn.

Click on their pictures to buy from them.



Caricature of a garlic bulb.
Back to Rocambole Garlics Table of Contents







Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Killarney Red - A rich, hot, strong Rocambole Garlic

Picture of garlic

Know where your food comes from - Buy Direct from our Growers below and Save.

Rocamboles grow better in cold winter gardens.

Harvests early-mid summer - stores through fall into winter.

- Easy to grow Rocambole for northerly growers. -

Killarney Red's source of origin is unknown and is thought to have come from German Red or Spanish Roja, but is said to grow better than both these days. It is a generally good sized and can be a rather large garlic. Being a Rocambole garlic, its flavor is very strong, hot and spicy and sticks around for a long time. From a growers perspective, it grows well in cold winter areas and usually grows healthy surprisingly uniform sized bulbs. It has thin bulb wrappers that have a lot of purple and brown in them.

Killarney Red usually has anywhere from 8 or 9 easy to peel cloves that are of good size, with no smaller inner cloves. The outer bulb wrappers are thin and flake off easily so it is not a very good storer, but no Rocambole is. For those up north who want to grow their own garlic, it is said to grow better in wet conditions than most other Rocamboles. It only takes a year or two to grow all you can eat. It harvests in mid-season but a little later than most of the other Rocamboles. Bulbs are usually over 2 1/2 inches in diameter and are of good size are grown primarily for their rich flavor and good growing characteristics.

Picture of Jeff and Billie Jean Westbrook of Gila Garlic.

Back to Rocambole Garlics Table of Contents







Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Korean Red AKA Korean Red Hot

Picture of garlic

Rocamboles grow better in cold winter gardens.

Harvests early summer - stores through fall into winter.

- May be available this year. -

Korean Red Hot is a generally a vigorous grower with large foliage that is dark green and results in a pretty good sized bulb. Being a Rocambole garlic, its flavor is very strong, hot and spicy and sticks around for a long time. From a growers perspective, it grows well in cold winter areas, but does poorly in warm winter areas, and usually grows healthy fairly uniform sized bulbs. It has thin bulb wrappers that have a lot of purple and brown in them.

I have a hard time deciding which hot garlic should be ranked where, but Korean Red Hot is certainly up there and I will just have to continue eating as many different ones as I can in an effort to improve. When I die, don't bother to bury me, just plant in the fall and water me, I'll probably sprout and grow.

Korean Red Hot usually has anywhere from 8 or 9 easy to peel cloves that are of good size, with no smaller inner cloves. The outer bulb wrappers are thin and flake off easily so it is not a very good storer, but no Rocambole is - through the fall and into winter. Great taste is their claim to fame, not long storage. For those up North who want to grow their own garlic it only takes a year or two to grow all you can eat. It harvests in early summer along with most of the other Rocamboles. Bulbs are usually over 2 1/2 inches in diameter and are of good size are grown primarily for their particularly rich flavor.


Caricature of a garlic bulb.

None of the growers in our farmers market currently have this cultivar for sale. If you grow this cultivar organically and wish to sell it in our online farmers market, please email me.bob@web-access.net


Order Korean Red from these growers now for shipping in the fall.

Picture of harvested garlic bulbs hanging in a barn. Picture of harvested garlic bulbs hanging in a barn.

There's room for you here..............There's room for you here

Click on their pictures to buy from them.


Back to Rocambole Garlics Table of Contents






Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Paw Paw -

Picture of Rocambole garlic

The rich, mellow Rocambole hardneck Garlic of the Midwest.

Rocamboles grow better in cold winter gardens.

Harvests in early summer - stores through fall into winter.

Paw Paw is rare because it is a full flavored mellow Rocambole with little or no hotness to the taste - excellent for Pesto.

Paw Paw is a generally good sized and can be a rather large garlic. Its flavor is rich and mellow like shallots but almost buttery and not hot or spicy and a warm pleasant aftertaste sticks around for a while. A very enriching taste experience and not one to burn your tongue.

From a grower's perspective, it grows well in cold winter areas and usually grows healthy surprisingly uniform sized bulbs. It has thick bulb wrappers for a rocambole and they have a lot of purple and brown layered across a white background - very attractive.

Paw Paw usually has anywhere from 8 or 9 easy to peel cloves that are of good size, with no smaller inner cloves. The outer bulb wrappers are thin and flake off easily so it is not a very good storer, but no Rocambole is. For those up north who want to grow their own garlic, it is said to grow well in wet conditions. It only takes a year or two to grow all you can eat. It harvests in early mid-season (Julyish) along with most of the other Rocamboles. Bulbs are usually over 2 1/2 inches in diameter and are of good size are grown primarily for their rich flavor and good growing characteristics.

It's always best to grow some longer storing Porcelain or Silverskin garlics as well as Rocamboles so you can have garlic all year round.

Caricature of a garlic bulb.

None of the growers in our farmers market currently have this cultivar for sale. If you grow this cultivar organically and wish to sell it in our online farmers market, please email me.bob@web-access.net

Back to Rocambole Garlics Table of Contents






Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Picture of a few Rocambole garlics.

Russian Red (Hardneck Rocambole garlic)

Russian Red is a Rocambole garlic with a rich, musky, garlicky flavor and is very hot when eaten raw.

Rocambole garlics have brownish-purplish bulb wrappers and easy to peel brownish clove covers and so does Killarney Red.

Rocamboles are valued for being early harvesting full flavored garlics that you can enjoy while waiting for the longer storing ones to mature and harvest. Russian Red's cloves are all of similar large size with no small cloves.

Usually harvests in late June/early July and stores into mid-winter at room temp.

Grows great in the northernmost locales but the further south you get the more difficult they are to grow and forget about growing them in the south.

Know for sure where your food comes from - buy direct from our growers below and save.

Order now for shipment in the fall.

Picture of Jeff and Billie Jean Westbrook of Gila Garlic.

Back to Rocambole Garlics Table of Contents







Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Slovenian -

Picture of Rocambole garlic

A rich, musky Rocambole hardneck Garlic

Harvests early in summer - stores into mid-fall.

- Order now for shipment in the fall. -

Finally! A delicious Rocambole that is not hot.

Slovenian is an early harvesting, richly flavored lightly pungent garlic that grows well in cold winter areas. In addition to being early harvesting, it is very easy peeling and stores long enough to be planted in the fall but not much longer. Grows consistently large bulbs with large cloves

Slovenian ranks 7-9 on the garlickiness scale and 1-2 on the pungency side. It has a very rich, musky, earthy flavor with only a little bite, if what I taste tested last year was its normal taste.

Caricature of a garlic bulb.

None of the growers in our farmers market currently have this cultivar for sale. If you grow this cultivar organically and wish to sell it in our online farmers market, please email me.bob@web-access.net


Back to Rocambole Garlics Table of Contents






Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Spanish Roja - A rich, hot, strong Rocambole Garlic

Picture of garlic

Know where your food comes from - Buy Direct from our Growers below and Save.

Rocamboles grow better in cold winter gardens.

Harvests early-mid summer - stores through fall into winter.

- Order now for fall shipment. -

Spanish Roja, an heirloom garlic, (a garden plant whose lineage can be traced for a 100 years or more) came to the Portland, Oregon area over a hundred years ago and was originally known as Greek or Greek Blue garlic. It is a generally a vigorous grower with large foliage that is dark green and results in a pretty good sized bulb. Being a Rocambole garlic, its flavor is very strong, hot and spicy and sticks around for a long time. It seems to have an especially rich taste. From a growers perspective, it grows well in cold winter areas, but does poorly in warm winter areas, and usually grows healthy fairly uniform sized bulbs. It has thin bulb wrappers that have a lot of purple and brown in them.

Spanish Roja has been Ron England's favorite garlic and he has said that when well grown, its flavor is that of true garlic. That sounds lika a pretty strong endorsement and he probably has a more discriminating palate than I, because there are so many whose distinctive taste attracts me, I have a hard time deciding which should be ranked where, but Spanish Roja is certainly up there and I will just have to continue eating as many different ones as I can in an effort to improve. When I die, don't bother to bury me, just plant in the fall and water me, I'll probably sprout and grow.

Spanish Roja usually has anywhere from 8 or 9 easy to peel cloves that are of good size, with no smaller inner cloves. The outer bulb wrappers are thin and flake off easily so it is not a very good storer, but no Rocambole is. Great taste is their claim to fame, not long storage. For those up North who want to grow their own garlic it only takes a year or two to grow all you can eat. It harvests in mid-season along with most of the other Rocamboles. Bulbs are usually over 2 1/2 inches in diameter and are of good size are grown primarily for their particularly rich flavor.


Picture of Jeff and Billie Jean Westbrook of Gila Garlic.

Back to Rocambole Garlics Table of Contents







Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Picture of beautiful Rocambole garlics.

Ukraine (cold winter hardneck Rocambole garlic)

Ukraine can grow into a big, robust, hardy, hardneck garlic. If you grow Porcelains or other later harvesting, longer storing garlics, you should also be growing this early harvesting hardneck and saving the longer storing ones for later. Grows well in most areas of the USA.

Taste test - I bit a good size plug out of the top a medium large clove, about one third of the clove and sat back to see what life had to offer for the next minute. Ukraine was crisp and crunchy with a light taste very much reminescent of shallots with a little sharpness of four to five on a scale of ten and there was a warm rich aftertaste that lingered for a few minutes. Actually, it was a delightful raw snack devoid of heavy garlickiness. This garlic will be excellent for salads and pesto among other raw uses where you might want a light but snappy garlic.

Usually harvests in early summer and stores into mid winter at room temp.

Order now for shipment in the fall.

Picture of Eric Hickory's family

Back to Rocamboles Table of Contents




Stylized caricature of a garlic plant.

- The information below is from gourmetgarlicgardens.com -
Please read.



Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Important notes for credit/debit card users:

This Farmers market is like your local farmers market. Each grower handles their own financial transactions.

When using your credit/debit card to buy direct from different growers, a separate order is required for each grower. You may buy as many different kinds of garlic as you want from any grower on any order but each grower requires a separate credit card transaction so that S & H charges may be properly calculated. If you want to order garlic from more than one grower, a separate payment must be made to each grower because they are independant businesses in different places.

Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Disclaimer

Each grower/vendor is responsible for their own garlic and prompt shipping to the buyer. Gourmet Garlic Gardens is not responsible for any garlic sent directly from any grower/vendor to any buyer Gourmet Garlic Gardens' total liability from all causes is limited to refunding any monies the buyer has paid directly to Gourmet Garlic Gardens.

Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Prices and availability of garlic subject to change without notice.

Caricature of a garlic bulb.



Caricature of a garlic bulb.

How Our Garlics are Grown

All the garlic for sale in our online farmers market was grown without the use of petrochemical pesticides, herbicides, or fertilizers; only natural and non-toxic fertilizers and pest control methods are used.

Some of our growers are Certified Organic and some are Certified Naturally Grown, which we regard as equal to Certified Organic in every meaningful way but without all the bureaucratic entanglements. All our farmers market growers grow organically and some are Certified Organic but not all want to be certified Organic because of the paperwork and reporting requirements and are among the best available sources of sustainable/ organic Garlic and they become Certified Naturally Grown, where the regulation comes from their fellow members rather than a federal bureacracy.

We do not allow growers who use synthetic petroleum-based fertilizers, pesticides, fungicides or herbicides to participate in our farmers market.

All garlic in our farmers market is grown in North America, no others allowed.
This farmers market is strictly for small-scale North American market gardeners/growers who live and grow sustainably.


Caricature of a garlic bulb.




Stylized caricature of a garlic plant.

We will be adding and deleting and changing the status of varieties often as our growers sell out of some and add more varieties so check back regularly to see what we currently list as available.
If you don't see what you want, check back again, we may have it later - we receive news about what's available from our growers continually. Or, E-Mail bob@web-access.net


Stylized caricature of a garlic plant.


- Garlic Books, Etc. -

Stylized caricature of a garlic plant.

Red line.

The Marriage of Mushrooms and Garlic

is the newest book about garlic and it is well-written and reads easy as the authors
have a warm friendly writing style that makes it fun to read and has some wonderful recipes.





Click here to read our review of The Marriage of Mushrooms and Garlic

by Chester Aaron and Malcolm Clark



Red line.

New - The Complete Book of Garlic is the best, most comprehensive book yet about garlic.

Book cover

Click here to read our review of The Complete Book of Garlic
by Ted Jordan Meredith

Stylized caricature of a garlic plant.

Red line.



The Classic Commercial Garlic Growers Guide

Ron's book cover

Click here to read our review of Growing Great Garlic
by Ron Engeland


Red line.

A Miscellany of Garlic

is the newest book about garlic and it is well-written and reads easy as the author has a warm friendly writing style that makes it fun to read.



Book cover

Click here to read our review of A Miscellany of Garlic

by Trina Clickner



Red line.

If you don't see what you want, E-Mail bob@web-access.net

Red line.


Stylized caricature of a garlic plant.

Basic Ordering Information


On any page of this website where the lists of garlic cultivars are displayed you can click on the name of any garlic and get a picture and/or a detailed description of that variety and some buttons you can click on to buy direct from different growers. Just decide how many pounds of which varieties you want from each grower and use your credit card to buy on line.

Red line.

Disclaimer

We make no guarantees or warranties of any kind whatsoever, expressed or implied, with respect to our garlic or the garlic sold by any growers who sell their garlic through our website. We do not guarantee or warrant the fitness, suitability or usability of our garlic for any particular purpose. We state only that the varieties we and the growers who sell through our website ship are to the best of our knowledge, the varieties we say they are. Any and all liability from all causes is limited to a refund of a customer's payment for the garlic in question.

We and the growers who sell through our website take great care to grow, harvest, cure and store our garlic properly and we will not knowingly ship garlic that is damaged, defective or diseased in any way we can see, feel or smell. We pack the garlic so as to minimize any probability of damage in shipment. If; however, you receive garlic that goes bad within 30 days, please call or e-mail the grower immediately stating the problem and return the defective garlic to the grower via Priority US Mail and the grower will either replace it at no additional charge, or refund your money for the defective garlic. It is our desire to provide our customers with the best garlic we can produce and enhance our reputation for excellence - but we cannot be held responsible for what happens after the garlic leaves our care.

All products are for sale to United States addresses only. We are not familiar with import-export laws and do not wish to engage in foreign trade at this time.


More TO COME...

Garlic Books, Garlic Accessories and Gardening Tools, Etc.


Stylized caricature of a garlic plant.


 a very different red line.
Stylized caricature of a garlic plant.

Pic of wildflowers around our ranch.

- Pictures of our Fabulous spring wildflowers some years. -

Stylized caricature of a garlic plant.

Bob Phillips' Texas Country Reporter did a story on me and the garlic for their long running TV program -
click here to see the 6:28 video on youtube:

Stylized caricature of a garlic plant.

 a very different red line.

Picture of the Garlicmeister playing his Indian flute.

Bob Anderson
Garlicmeister, a self-inflicted title for amusement only.
Photo courtesy of Bill Yeates.


Caricature of a garlic bulb.

If you would like to communicate with us, please send email to:
bob@web-access.net

Gourmet Garlic Gardens,
12300 FM 1176
Bangs, TX 76823 -
(325) 348 - 3049

[ Navigation Menu - Click these links to go to other pages on our website. ]
[ Home ] [ Garlic Overview ] [ 70 Varieties ] [ Growing Garlic ] [ Cooking Garlic ] [ Preserve Garlic ] [ Garlic Pills, Etc. ] [ Health Benefits ] [ Garlic Chemistry ] [ FAQs ] [ About Us ] [ How to Order ]
Red line.
[ Buy Garlic Here ] [ Artichoke Garlic ] [ Asiatic Garlic ] [ Creole Garlic ] [ Porcelain Garlic ] [ Purple Stripe Garlic ] [ Rocambole Garlic ] [ Silverskin Garlic ] [ Turban Garlic ] [ Buy samplers Here ]
Red line.
[ Our Online Farmers Market ] [ Grow Garlic in the South, CA & Texas ] [ Tour our Garlic Garden ] [ Paint Rock Pictographs ] [ Newsletter ] [ Garlic is Life ] [ Good Growers Wanted ] [ Spring 2007 ]

Our site is always under construction. -- This page last updated February 7, 2014.

Our webpages have been visited over 3 million times since July of 1997 by people looking for the latest information about garlic and to buy the best gourmet garlics. Thank you one and all.
- Copyright 1997 through 2013, all rights rreserved. -