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Garlic, the sweet breath of life!

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Gourmet Garlic 101 - Overview Table of Contents

[ Click these links to go to items on this page. ]

[ Artichokes ] [ Asiatics ] [ Creoles ] [ Porcelains ] [ Purple Stripes ] [ Rocamboles ] [ Silverskins ] [ Turbans ] [ Elephant Garlic ]

[ Alphabetical listing of gourmet garlics ]

- [ Milder Garlics ] - [ Medium Flavored Garlics ] - [ Stronger Tasting Garlics ]




The Garlic Family Tree and Where Garlic Came from


Garlic isn't just garlic, there are many different kinds of garlic and they're almost all different in size, color, shape, taste, number of cloves per bulb, pungency and storability. Most Americans aren't aware of the many kinds since they seldom see more than one kind in the local supermarket. There are said to be over 600 cultivated sub-varieties of garlic in the world, although most of them may be selections of only a handful of basic types that have been grown widely and developed their own characteristics over the centuries as local growing conditions changed.

Botanists classify all true garlics under the species Allium Sativum. There are two subspecies; Ophioscorodon , or hard-necked garlics (Ophios for short) and Sativum , or soft-necked garlics. The hard-necked garlics were the original garlics and the soft-necked ones were developed or cultivated over the centuries by growers from the original hard-necks through a process of selection.

The latest research (2003) shows that ten fairly distinct varietal groups of garlic have evolved; five very different hardneck varieties called Porcelain, Purple Stripe, Marbled Purple Stripe, Glazed Purple Stripe, and Rocambole; three varieties of Weakly bolting hadnecks that often produce softnecks - Creole,Asiatic and Turban, plus two distinct softneck varietal groups; Artichoke and Silverskin. Our website has evolved to show this new structure

Botanists originally thought that there were only five groups of garlics. Then a 1995 study attempted to classify garlic into 17 isozyme types, but that didn't work out satisfactorily. Eventually Dr. Gail Volk of the USDA in Colorado and Dr. Joachim Keller of the Institute of Plant Biology in Gaterslaben, Germany, independently did DNA analyses of garlics and classified correctly in 2003. The separate studies verified there were ten separate, distinct varieties of garlic. It's nice to finally get some real structure we can build around.

Apparently all of the hundreds of sub-varieties (separate cultivars) of garlic grown all over the world came from these ten basic groups or sub-varieties of hardnecks that evolved in the Caucasus Mountains between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea. Their individual characteristics have been altered over time by careful (or accidental) selection and changing growing conditions, such as soil fertility, rainfall, temperature, altitude, length and severity of winter, etc. as they spread across Asia and Europe and the Asiatics and Turbans developed in the East, while the Creoles developed in Spain and southern France and Artichokes and Silverskins developed Italy and elsewhere in Europe.

This picture of the structure of the garlic family is probably final but still work continues to define it more accurately using a larger number of cultivars and this may lead to the refining of the identification of clusters of sub-varieties but the basic picture is pretty much complete.


How Did All These Garlics Get Here?


A few of the kinds of garlic now in America came in with Polish, German and Italian immigrants over the centuries, but most of them came in all at once in 1989. The USDA had been asking the Soviets for permission to go to the Caucasus region to collect garlics but permission had always been refused because there were many missile bases in the area and this was where their spaceport was and is.

Finally, as the Soviet Union was disintegrating in 1989, they suddenly invited the Americans in to collect the garlics. They were under continuous armed guard and were allowed to travel only at night so they wouldn't see anything of military importance. They went from village to village along the old Silk Road buying garlic from local markets and naming the cultivars after the town or village where they were purchased.

When they got back to the US, they realized they had no gardens ready in which to plant the garlic (The USDA plans things years in advance.) so they contracted out the growing to a few private growers on a share-the-garlic basis. After their crops were harvested and the USDA got their share, these growers began to trade with each other and to sell some to friends and other garlic growers and that is how they came to be available now when they were not available 25 or 30 years ago. There was no time for adequate phytosanitary precautions to be made so we don't really know what kinds of "hitchhikers" might have been brought in with them./font

The above explanation also shows why these garlics are rare and expensive. Slowly more growers are beginning to grow these cultivars and as more of it is grown and the supply begins to catch up with the very great demand. Garlic lovers take one look at these delightful things and they feel an overwhelming urge to try them. In a few years, these gourmet garlics will be more widely grown and the price will eventually come down somewhat, but not as long as all growers are selling out in a short time.


Hard-necked garlics (Ophioscorodon)


Beautiful Porcelain Garlic - note the large cloves.


Porcelain Garlics


Porcelain garlics (ophios) are among the most beautiful garlics of all and sometimes seem too beautiful to eat. Their bulb wrappers tend to be very thick, luxuriant and parchment-like and tightly cover their few, but large, cloves. The outer bulb wrappers are often very white and tend to some purple striping as you peel away the wrappers. Their appearance tempts one to wonder whether they were sculpted by some great artist rather than something grown in the ground. There are few or no smaller cloves as most cloves are large and fat (typically only five really big cloves per bulb).

All hardneck garlics grow scapes in the spring with each variety having a characteristic shape based on its genetics with Purple Stripe garlics forming 3/4 of a loop and Rocamboles forming a full double loop before straightening up. Porcelain garlic's pattern is that there is no pattern and a bed of Porcelain garlics looks like a bed of snakes, hence the term serpent garlic for Porcelain garlic in times past.

Porcelains are generally strong tasting garlics with a few exceptions and can store for up to eight to ten months or more at cool room temperature, if grown well. Bulb wrappers vary from white/ivory (Zemo) to very purplish (Romanian Red). Clove covers have elongated tips and a golden brown color with some having distinctive vertical, purplish streaks.

Porcelains grow better up north than they do down south but still most southern growers can grow them some years except in semi-tropical areas like southern Florida and California and south Texas.


Click Here to learn about and buy Specific Cultivars of Porcelain Garlics



Beautiful Rocambole Garlic - Very Flavorful Gourmet Garlics.


Rocambole Garlics


Rocambole garlics tend to have thinner bulb wrappers than other ophios and lots of purple striping and splotches. They are not as white as other ophios and seem to have a brownish cast to them, in fact, some of them almost look as though they need a bath. What they lack in beauty, they make up for in taste. Many people (including Ron Engeland-author of "Growing Great Garlic")consider them their favorite garlics.

They are very, very flavorful garlics and most of them very hot.

In the spring they send up a scape (stalk) that forms a complete double loop before straightening up. They have usually eight to ten cloves arranged in circular fashion about a central scape and have few or no smaller internal cloves.

Alas, we shall not know success with them as they do not grow well in warmer climates such as ours. They require a colder winter and a cooler spring than we have here in central Texas. We have tried for years to "southernize" these garlics, but to no avail; they simply die in the ground here so we have to buy them from those who can grow them.

If you want to try these culinary delights, you can order them from the growers in our gardeners marketplace. Their primary drawback is that they are among the shorter storing garlics, seldom storing beyond mid-winter so you go months without good garlic. For that reason I recommend growing the longer storing Porcelains which usually grow well in the same places as Rocamboles.


Click Here to learn about and buy Specific Cultivars of Rocambole Garlics

Beautiful Porcelain Garlic - note the large cloves.


Purple Stripe Garlics

Purple Stripe garlics are ophios (hardnecks) and are usually vividly striped with purplish vertical stripes decorating the bulb wrappers, hence their name. In between the purple stripes, their bulb wrappers are usually very white and thick. Some sub-varieties are even heavily splotched with purple. Coloration is affected by growing conditions, particularly weather and sometimes they are strongly colored and at other times more white than purple.

They tend to be rather rich in flavor, but not overly pungent, though some are milder, and store fairly well. Standard Purple Stripes (Chesnok Red and Persian Star) make the sweetest roasted garlic. They mature about midway through the local harvest season although the larger ones may mature later.


Beautiful Porcelain Garlic - note the large cloves.

In addition to the standard purple stripes, there are two other groups of Purple Stripe varieties, the glazed group and the marbled group. Both seem to have thicker bulb wrappers and fewer cloves per bulb than the standard group with Marbled Purple Stripe garlics averaging about five huge cloves per bulb.

All hardneck garlics grow scapes in the spring with each variety having a characteristic shape based on its genetics with Purple Stripe garlics forming 3/4 of a loop and Rocamboles forming a full double loop before straightening up.

Purple stripes can be very beautiful garlics that range from the very strong, such as Metechi or Skuri #2 or very mild, such as Siberian. Persian Star and Chesnok Red have a rich medium flavor


Click Here to learn about and buy Specific Cultivars of Purple Stripe Garlics


Soft-necked garlics
(Allium Sativum Sativum)


Beautiful Porcelain Garlic - note the large cloves.

Artichoke Garlics

Artichoke garlics (sativums or softnecks) are the kinds of garlics seen most in the supermarkets in our part of the country. California Early and California Late are grown in huge quantities around Gilroy, California and shipped all over the country and are the generic garlic that most people think of when they think of garlic. In fact, most people around our parts weren't even aware that there was more than one kind of garlic. We think artichoke garlics are among the easiest to grow and seem to less fussy about growing conditions than the others. They have lots of cloves, usually somewhere between 12 and 20, with lots of smaller internal cloves. These are a favorite among people who want to use only a very small amount of garlic in a dish (although I can't imagine why). They appear to feel that if you can taste the garlic in a dish you have used too much and prefer to use the small inner cloves.

Artichokes are generally very large, store well and have a wide range of flavors with some, like Simoneti and Red Toch, being very mild and pleasant and others, such as Inchelium Red and Susanville, have greater depth of flavor. Chinese Purple and Purple Cauldron are much stronger and stick around for a while. The Asiatic group of artichoke garlics tend to send up scapes, despite the fact that they're supposed to be softnecks and have a little more color to the bulb wrappers than the main group, which are usually very white. The Turban group of artichoke garlics tend to be the most colorful artichokes and have fewer cloves per bulb than the others. The turbans also harvest earlier and store less long than the other artichokes and a good bit stronger in taste as well.

Artichoke Garlics are the commercial growers favorite because they are easier to grow and produce larger bulbs that most other garlics. Artichokes are often called red garlics or Italian garlics despite the fact that most are neither red nor were ever grown in Italy. Most of the artichokes that have red as part of their name have no red in them, but we retain the word as it helps to describe exactly which cultivar we are discussing.

Click Here to learn about and buy Specific Cultivars of Artichoke Garlics


Beautiful Silverskin Garlic.

Silverskin Garlics


Silverskin garlics are usually, but not always, the ones that you see in braids. Silverskins are generally the longest storing of all garlics and have a soft pliable neck that lends itself to braiding and holds up over time better than the artichokes whose necks tend to deteriorate earlier than the silverskins. They are usually fairly hot strong garlics with very few cultivars being mild. They are also usually the last ones to come out of the ground. Their bulb wrappers are very white although the clove covers can be strikingly beautiful as in the case of Nootka Rose or Rose du Var. Silverskins have more cloves per bulb, on the average, than the artichokes but are not as large.

Click Here to learn about and buy Specific Cultivars of Silverskin Garlics



Picture of Creole garlic (Burgundy) Closeup Picture of Creole garlic (Burgundy)

the Creole Garlics

The Creole garlics are a unique and truly beautiful group of garlics. They share characteristics of one kind or another with all other kinds of garlic but are utterly unique and in a class by themselves.

Botanists had a hard time pinning them down until Dr. Gail Volk of the USDA in Colorado and Dr. Joachim Keller of Gaterslaben, Germany, independently classified them correctly in 2003. The separate studies verified they were a separate variety all to themselves but that's pretty obvious when you look at them - there's nothing else like them.

Creoles are one of three varieties classified as weakly bolting hardnecks in that not all plants grow a scape, only some of them. They are like a mix of hardneck and softneck. The other two wealky bolting hardnecks are the Asiatic and Turban varieties.

Creoles are downright gorgeous to look at and most are amongt the easiest eating raw garlics owing to a taste that is rich and full but only very moderate pungency (heat), though Creole Red is noticeably stronger and Ajo Rojo is a very hot garlic. They have eight to twelve cloves per bulb arranged in a circular configuration. Both the bulb wrappers and the clove covers have a beautiful vivid rose color and I regard them to be as beautiful as the porcelain garlics even though their configuration is very different. They are easily grown in southern climates and are much more tolerant of adverse weather conditions than most garlics.

All hardneck garlics grow scapes in the spring with each variety having a characteristic shape based on its genetics with Purple Stripe garlics forming 3/4 of a loop and Rocamboles forming a full double loop before straightening up. Interestingly, all the weakly bolting hardnecks, Creoles, Asiatics and Turbans all have the same scape pattern; i.e, they do a U-turn where the scape curls over just enough for the bulbil capsule to point to the ground for a week or more before straightening up.

Click Here to learn about and buy Specific Cultivars of Creole Garlics



Asiatic Garlics

Beautiful Porcelain Garlic - note the large cloves.

Weakly Bolting Hardneck Garlics.

Asiatics and Turbans share some interesting characteristics and are also the very earliest harvesting of all garlics and if you can grow them you'll have garlic before anyone else's is anywhere near ready to harvest. They are short storing garlics as most don't last more than 5 months at room temperature before sprouting. They are always the first garlics to sprout in the fall. They are also unusual in that they don't mature gradually like all the other garlics; when they are ready, their tops start to fall over, like onions. That's the time to check their bulb size and get ready to start harvesting them before they lose all their bulb wrappers, as they will if they stay in the ground for very long after they are ready to be harvested. If they lose their bulb wrappers, their storage time will be reduced even more than usual.

Asiatics have rather white bulb wrappers which can be thick and parchment-like and straw-colored clove covers and have eight to ten fat cloves with no tiny internal cloves. When they have a scape, their bulbils are few but very large, pea-size bukbils.

Click Here to learn about and buy Specific Cultivars of Asiatic Garlics



Turban Garlics

Beautiful Porcelain Garlic - note the large cloves.

Weakly Bolting Hardneck Garlics.

Asiatics and Turbans share some interesting characteristics and are also the very earliest harvesting of all garlics and if you can grow them you'll have garlic before anyone else's is anywhere near ready to harvest. They are short storing garlics as most don't last more than 5 months at room temperature before sprouting. They are always the first garlics to sprout in the fall. They are also unusual in that they don't mature gradually like all the other garlics; when they are ready, their tops start to fall over, like onions. That's the time to check their bulb size and get ready to start harvesting them before they lose all their bulb wrappers, as they will if they stay in the ground for very long after they are ready to be harvested. If they lose their bulb wrappers, their storage time will be reduced even more than usual.

Turbans usually have lots of color in their bulb wrappers and brownish clove covers and only five or so huge cloves with no tiny ones. When they bolt, their bulbils are small and numerous, maybe 30/plant.

Click Here to learn about and buy Specific Cultivars of Turban Garlics


Garlic Which is Not Garlic

Picture of a Rocambole garlic.


Elephant Garlic

Not all plants that some people think of as garlic is actually garlic of the species Allium Sativum. Elephant garlic is Allium ampeloprasum. Ramsons garlic is a broad-leaved wild garlic and is of the species allium ursinum. Crow garlic is a narrow-leafed smallish wild garlic of the species allium vineale. Garlic chives is of the species allium tuberosum.

Click here to buy Elephant Garlic - All Size Cloves Available

Elephant garlic is not a true garlic; it is a leek. All garlic species are botanically classified as Allium Sativum and elephant garlic is Allium Ampeloprasum, formerly Allium Gigantum.

Elephant garlic is worthy of great respect because it is extremely hardy and re-seeds itself every year assuring you of many future crops with minimal effort. Elephant garlic is generally pretty resistant to many things that bother true garlic much to the gardeners delight.

It can produce about as much allicin as milder true garlics and its giant cloves make it easy to prepare, much to the cook's delight.

Elephant garlic can store for about a year at room temp - wow!

Large elephant garlic is about twice the size of the largest real garlics or larger and has a milder taste but with a sharp onion-like edge to it and a distinctive aftertaste. They average five monstrously large cloves that are somewhat yellowish compared the milky whiteness of true garlic cloves. It also has less allicin potential than real garlic but grows extremely clean and disease free and does not seem to be bothered by insects.

Elephant garlic stores very hard and clean much longer than real garlic, even when separated into individual cloves. Unlike real garlic it produces bottom bulbils called corms that have very hard shells with sharp pointed tops and they store even longer than the bulbs. The corms are attached to the bottoms of the bulbs but grow up their sides and are often incorporated into the bulb wrappers several layers deep. The bulb wrappers on elephant garlic are extremely white and they cure out to be very thin and flaky and are intact only on freshly harvested bulbs. After a few months they seem to evaporate, leaving bare or almost bare bulbs that have a rather rough look but it does not seem to affect their storability much, only their appearance.

What's not to like about these gentle giants?


The Many Tastes of Garlic

Believe it or not, all garlics do not taste the same. Some cultivars are exceedingly mild in taste, such as Chet's Italian Red and Red Toch (both Artichokes). Some are medium flavored like Inchelium Red (another Artichoke) or Burgundy (a Creole ) while others are very hot and strong, such as Metechi (a marbled Purple Stripe) or Chinese Purple (Asiatic). I usually enjoy a milder garlic for eating raw and stronger garlics for cooking or for using as medicine. Each garlic is different in taste, but don't take my word for it, try several kinds to see which tastes appeal to you as each of us has our own likes.

There are several components to garlic taste, but we only measure three of them - flavor (or garlickiness), pungency (whicchh is the degree of hotness when eaten raw) and residual or aftertaste, which for some varieties is considerable, and it's not necessarily related to pungency.

We measure (subjectively) heat, flavor, and aftertaste on a scale from 1 to 10, each. Raw garlic is hot like a chile pepper, it just doesn't last over a minute, usually and has an aftertaste. Flavor is the intensity of the garlic taste itself, whether it is hot or not; that is, the garlickiness of it. Some have a heavy flavor but mild in heat, whereas others may be light in both or very heavy in both. If you get garlic that scores a ten on all three scales, you have a very potent garlic.

Even among the hot garlics, taste varies. Chinese Purple (Asiatic) for example is instantly hot, whereas Asian Rose, another Asiatic AKA Chinese Sativum, produces a truly beautiful garlic flavor with no hint of heat for about ten seconds then your mouth seems to explode with heat. Some varieties I have taste tested had a delay of almost 30 seconds before the raging one minute inferno set in. Unlike Hot peppers, or chilis as they are properly called, the heat from garlic dissipates quickly, usually in 30 to 45 seconds. Garlic is only hot when eaten raw as cooking removes the heat. This overview is intended to be brief and a detailed discussion of taste will be included in each of the illustrated varietal descriptions of the garlics we have for sale.

The taste of any given garlic changes almost continually. Any garlic is usually milder soon after it is pulled from the ground than it will be after a few months of storage as the chemistry within the garlic evolves during the year. Once pulled from the ground, garlic slowly dehydrates in a natural drying down process that takes months and as it loses its moisture it slowly shrinks in size and the flavor begins to condense and continues to intensify as long as it is stored at room temperature. If at any point during this process you slice and dry it, it will retain whatever flavor it had at that point and will not change any more. Shelf life at room temp and about 50% humidity is from four to ten months or longer, depending on the variety and the health and condition of the garlic.

Also, growing conditions directly affect taste. While each cultivar has its normal flavor, that is, what it tastes like in a normal year, each one varies from year to year based on that years growing conditions. Adverse weather can make normally mild varieties hot and usually hot garlics become mild - but the next year they return to normal. Our varietal description will try to describe the current crop's taste as accurately as possible since we test taste random samples of each cultivar.

All taste tests are done with raw garlic because that is the only way I know of to accurately determine the true taste of a garlic since cooking changes the flavor of any garlic. Please read our section on cooking with garlic for a detailed discussion of how cooking affects the flavor of garlic. There we talk about some tricks you can use to make the garlic flavor mild and creamy or as bold as you prefer.

Burgundy has a deep flavor yet mild heat that make it a delight for raw eating - most creoles have this characteristic although some are a little stronger. Red Toch, Chester Aaron's favorite, has a similar taste - lightrichness. Chesnok Red and Siberian fall in there somewhere. Inchelium Red and Nootka Rose are excellent medium and medium warm tasting garlics and are very good for raw eating with rich fullness.

Hardnecks, such as Rocamboles, Purple Stripes and Porcelains have generally the deepest flavors with Rocamboles having the most earthy and musty flavor and usually a lot of heat, but storing the shortest time. Rocamboles are excellent for raw eating even though they're strong because of the deep, rich, earthy flavor that just makes everything feel better. Commercial Artichoke garlics are generally considered to have the least flavor of garlics, although they can have a lot of heat, they may not have much depth.

Have you ever noticed how difficult it is to get good garlic at your local supermarket during the late winter through mid-summer? There is a reason for that-most garlic sold in stores is artichoke garlic and by that time it is beginning to deteriorate or trying to sprout and grow as it has been out of the ground long past its time to be replanted (the fall). It is usually sometime around mid-July before good garlic again becomes available.

Because most garlics grown in the United States are grown in more northerly latitudes, the time to harvest usually starts in late June or early July. Since we are located in the southernmost part of the country, our garlic matures a month or two earlier than the northern growers so we can offer high quality gourmet varieties much sooner than most other growers. We often begin harvesting in mid May and can have freshly harvested garlic available in June.

Elephant garlic is so mild you can take a whole bulb of it and slice the cloves into quarter inch thick steaks, sauté them in butter or olive oil and serve them as a vegetable.



In Summary


The hard-neck garlics tend to be more colorful and have fewer, but larger, cloves per bulb than the softnecks. Soft-necks generally have about twice as many cloves per bulb as the hard-necks. The Silverskins (soft-necks) tend to be the longest storing garlics with Porcelains (hardnecks) the second-longest storing and are usually hot and strong in flavor-though not always. The Asiatics (hard-necks) tend to be the shortest storing kinds with Rocamboles (another hardneck) next and Rocamboles and seem to be unsuited to growing well in the southern climates, unless grown at higher altitudes. The other main varieties all fall in between and grow well in our soil and produce generally superior garlics as long as we get decent rain and reasonable temperatures.




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Available Garlics Listed by Alphabetical order

Alphabetic listing of Gourmet Garlics - For Mild, Medium and Strong listings, scroll down.

Ajo Rojo (Creole)
Amish Rocambole (Rocambole)
Applegate (Artichoke)
Asian Tempest (Asiatic)
Bavarian (Rocambole)
Belarus (Purple Stripe)
Bogatyr (Marbled Purple Stripe)
Brown Tempest (Marbled Purple Stripe)
Burgundy (Creole)
California Early (Artichoke)
California Late (Artichoke)
Caretaker (Rocambole)
Carpathian (Rocambole)
Celeste (Rocambole)
Chesnok Red (Purple Stripe)

China Dawn (Turban)
Chinese Purple (Turban)
Creole Red (Creole)
Cuban Purple (Creole)
Early Red Italian (Moderate Artichoke)
Georgian Crystal (Porcelain)
Georgian Fire (Porcelain)
German Extra Hardy (Porcelain)
German Giant (Rocambole)
German Red (Rocambole)
German White (Porcelain)

Germinador (Creole)
Gourmet Red (Marbled Purple Stripe)
Idaho Silver (Silverskin)
Inchelium Red (Artichoke)
Italian Easy Peel (Rocambole)
Italian Late (Artichoke)
Italian Purple (Artichoke)
Japanese (Asiatic)
Killarney Red(Rocambole)
Korean Red (Asiatic)
Korean Red Hot (AKA Korean Red Rocambole) (Rocambole)
Leah 99 (Porcelaiin)
Leningrad (Porcelain)
Lorz Italian (Artichoke)
Maiskij (Turban)
Metechi (Marbled Purple Stripe)
Mild French (Silverskin)
Music (Porcelain)

Nootka Rose (Silverskin)
Northern White (Porcelain)
Paw Paw (Rocambole)
Persian Star (Purple Stripe)
Polish Jenn (Porcelain)
Polish Hardneck (Porcelain)
Polish Softneck (Artichoke)
Polish White (Artichoke)
Pskem (Marbled Purple Stripe)
Purple Glazer (Glazed Purple Stripe)
Purple Italian (Rocambole)
Red Janice (Turban)
Red Toch (Artichoke)

Rogue River Red (Artichoke)
Romanian Red (Porcelain)
Rose de Lautrec (Rich French Creole)
Rosewood (Porcelain)
Russian Red (Rocambole)
S & H Silverskin (Silverskin)
Shandong (Turban)
Shilla (Turban)
Siberian (Marbled Purple Stripe)

Siciliano (Artichoke from Sicily)
Silver Rose (Silverskin)
Silverwhite (Silverskin)
Simoneti (Artichoke)
Slovenian (Rocambole)
Sonoran (Asiatic)
Spanish Roja (Rocambole)
Stull (Porcelain)
Susanville (Artichoke)
Thermadrone (Asiatic)
Transylvanian (Artichoke)
Tzan (Turban)
Ukraine (Rocambole)
Xian (Turban)
Zemo (Porcelain)

Back to this page's Table of Contents

We now include an online garlic farmers market where you buy direct
from each market gardener - just like at your local farmers market.

Click Here to order Garlics direct from the growers -


Stylized caricature of a garlic plant.

If you don't see what you want, E-Mail bob@web-access.net





Gourmet Garlic Varieties for Sale

As mentioned above, we are now operating as a garlic gardeners market for garlic gardeners across the country. Each grower is responsible for their own produce and their own prices and their own customer relations. Gourmetgarlicgardens.com serves only as a popular meeting place where grower and buyer can find each other and a cashier of convenience to both buyer and seller.

The gourmet garlic cultivars listed above appear likely be available from our growers this year based on current crop outlooks. You might want to try several different kinds from several different growers. Go ahead and experiment.

If you would like a picture and/or detailed description of any of these garlics, just click on the name of the variety.

Red line.

Pricing - Prices subject to change without notice.

All growers determine their own prices, we don't tell anyone what to charge for their own produce. Like all growers everywhere, they are free to change their prices as they see fit.
If you want don't see what you want, E-Mail bob@web-access.net and ask us - you might be surprised at what we can get, grow or find.





Stylized caricature of a garlic plant.

Available Garlics Listed by Taste/Flavor

Clicking on a garlic name will give you a color picture and/or complete description of that specific garlic and growers to buy it from.
Use your back arrow key to return to this point.

Milder Flavored Gourmet Garlics -
- Scroll down for medium and hot/strong tasting garlics. -


Growers come and go and availability of garlic cultivars changes often so check back frequently.

Garlics are listed in alphabetical order, not in order of pungency

Applegate (Artichoke)
Bavarian (Rocambole)
Belarus (Purple Stripe)
Burgundy (Creole)
China Dawn (Turban)
Creole Red (Creole)
Cuban Purple (Creole)
Germinador (Creole)
Italian Purple (Artichoke)
Korean Red (Asiatic)
Paw Paw (Rocambole)
Polish Softneck (Artichoke)
Polish White (Artichoke)
Purple Italian (Rocambole)
Red Toch (Artichoke)
Rogue River Red (Artichoke)
S & H Silverskin (Silverskin)
Siberian (Marbled Purple Stripe)
Simoneti (Artichoke)
Slovenian (Rocambole)


Back to this page's Table of Contents

Caricature of a garlic bulb.


Medium Flavored Gourmet Garlics

Garlics are listed in alphabetical order, not in order of pungency.

California Early (Artichoke)
Chesnok Red (Purple Stripe)
Early Red Italian (Moderate Artichoke)

Georgian Crystal (Porcelain)
Gourmet Red (Marbled Purple Stripe)
Idaho Silver (Silverskin)
Inchelium Red (Artichoke)
Italian Easy Peel (Rocambole)
Japanese (Asiatic)
Leah 99 (Porcelaiin)
Mild French (Silverskin)
Nootka Rose (Silverskin)
Persian Star (Purple Stripe)
Polish Jenn (Porcelain)
Polish Softneck (Artichoke)
Purple Glazer (Glazed Purple Stripe)
Rose de Lautrec (Rich French Creole)
Shilla (Turban)
Siciliano (Artichoke from Sicily)
Silver Rose (Silverskin)
Silverwhite (Silverskin)
Sonoran (Asiatic)
Susanville (Artichoke)
Thermadrone (Artichokes)
Ukraine (Rocambole)
Xian (Turban)


Back to this page's Table of Contents

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Hotter, Stronger Flavored Gourmet Garlics

Garlics are listed in alphabetical order, not in order of pungency.


Ajo Rojo (Creole)
Amish Rocambole (Rocambole)
Asian Tempest (Asiatic)
Bogatyr (Marbled Purple Stripe)
Brown Tempest (Marbled Purple Stripe)
California Late (Artichoke)
Caretaker (Rocambole)
Carpathian (Rocambole)
Celeste (Rocambole)
Chinese Purple (Turban)
Georgian Fire (Porcelain)
German Extra Hardy (Porcelain)
German Red (Rocambole)
German White (Porcelain)
Italian Late (Artichoke)
Killarney Red(Rocambole)
Korean Red Hot (AKA Korean Red Rocambole) (Rocambole)
Leningrad (Porcelain)
Lorz Italian (Artichoke)
Maiskij (Turban)
Metechi (Marbled Purple Stripe)
Music (Porcelain)
Northern White (Porcelain)
Polish Hardneck (Porcelain)
Pskem (Marbled Purple Stripe)
Red Janice (Turban)
Rosewood (Porcelain)
Romanian Red (Porcelain) (Marbled Purple Stripe)
Russian Red (Rocambole)
Shandong (Turban)
Stull (Porcelain)
Spanish Roja (Rocambole)
Transylvanian (Artichoke)
Tzan (Turban)
Zemo (Porcelain)

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Click Here to order bulk Garlics by varietal type.

Click Here to order bulk Garlics direct from the growers.

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Back to this page's Table of Contents




Click Here to order Sampler Assortments of Garlics -

Click Here to order bulk Garlics sorted by taste/flavor -

Click Here to order bulk Garlics by varietal type -

Click Here to order bulk Garlics direct from the growers -


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- The information below is from gourmetgarlicgardens.com -
Please read.



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Important notes for credit/debit card users:

This Farmers market is like your local farmers market. Each grower handles their own financial transactions.

When using your credit/debit card to buy direct from different growers, a separate order is required for each grower. You may buy as many different kinds of garlic as you want from any grower on any order but each grower requires a separate credit card transaction so that S & H charges may be properly calculated. If you want to order garlic from more than one grower, a separate payment must be made to each grower because they are independant businesses in different places.

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Disclaimer

Each grower/vendor is responsible for their own garlic and prompt shipping to the buyer. Gourmet Garlic Gardens is not responsible for any garlic sent directly from any grower/vendor to any buyer
Gourmet Garlic Gardens' total liability from all causes is limited to refunding any monies the buyer has paid directly to Gourmet Garlic Gardens.

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Prices and availability of garlic subject to change without notice.

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This farmers market is strictly for small-scale North American market gardeners/growers who live and grow sustainably.

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We will be adding and deleting and changing the status of varieties often as our growers sell out of some and add more varieties so check back regularly to see what we currently list as available.
If you don't see what you want, check back again, we may have it later - we receive news about what's available from our growers continually. Or, E-Mail bob@web-access.net

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Welcome to our Online Catalog.
Five ways to buy from the growers in our Farmers Market:

1. - If you know the name of the garlic you want to buy,
click here look it up in an alphabetical listing and click on the name of the one you want.
or
2. - If you don't know the name of the garlic you want to buy,
click here look it up in a list sorted by mild, medium and hot/strong
and click on the name of one that sounds good to you.
or
3. - If you just want a sampler assortment
click here buy a sampler assortment of several varieties.
and click on the name of one that sounds good to you.
or
4. - Click here to go to our farmers market and click on the picture
of a grower you feel good about and buy from them.
or
5.- Call Bob at (325) 348-3049

Order now for fall shipment.


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- Garlic Books, Etc. -

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The Marriage of Mushrooms and Garlic

is the newest book about garlic and it is well-written and reads easy as the authors
have a warm friendly writing style that makes it fun to read and has some wonderful recipes.





Click here to read our review of The Marriage of Mushrooms and Garlic

by Chester Aaron and Malcolm Clark



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New - The Complete Book of Garlic is the best, most comprehensive book yet about garlic.

Book cover

The Complete Book of Garlic
by Ted Jordan Meredith

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The Classic Commercial Garlic Growers Guide

Ron's book cover

Growing Great Garlic
by Ron Engeland


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A Miscellany of Garlic

is the newest book about garlic and it is well-written and reads easy as the author has a warm friendly writing style that makes it fun to read.



Book cover

A Miscellany of Garlic

by Trina Clickner



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If you don't see what you want, E-Mail bob@web-access.net

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Basic Ordering Information


On any page of this website where the lists of garlic cultivars are displayed you can click on the name of any garlic and get a picture and/or a detailed description of that variety and some buttons you can click on to buy direct from different growers. Just decide how many pounds of which varieties you want from each grower and use your credit card to buy on line.

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Disclaimer

We make no guarantees or warranties of any kind whatsoever, expressed or implied, with respect to our garlic or the garlic sold by any growers who sell their garlic through our website. We do not guarantee or warrant the fitness, suitability or usability of our garlic for any particular purpose. We state only that the varieties we and the growers who sell through our website ship are to the best of our knowledge, the varieties we say they are. Any and all liability from all causes is limited to a refund of a customer's payment for the garlic in question.

We and the growers who sell through our website take great care to grow, harvest, cure and store our garlic properly and we will not knowingly ship garlic that is damaged, defective or diseased in any way we can see, feel or smell. We pack the garlic so as to minimize any probability of damage in shipment. If; however, you receive garlic that goes bad within 30 days, please call or e-mail the grower immediately stating the problem and return the defective garlic to the grower via Priority US Mail and the grower will either replace it at no additional charge, or refund your money for the defective garlic. It is our desire to provide our customers with the best garlic we can produce and enhance our reputation for excellence - but we cannot be held responsible for what happens after the garlic leaves our care.

All products are for sale to United States addresses only unless special arrangements are made with the grower.


More TO COME...

Garlic Books, Garlic Accessories and Gardening Tools, Etc.


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Pic of wildflowers around our ranch.

- Pictures of our Fabulous spring wildflowers some years. -

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Bob Phillips' Texas Country Reporter did a story on me and the garlic for their long running TV program -
click here to see the 6:28 video on youtube:

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Picture of the Garlicmeister playing his Indian flute.

Bob Anderson
Garlicmeister, a self-inflicted title for amusement only.
Photo courtesy of Bill Yeates.


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If you would like to communicate with us, please send email to:
bob@web-access.net

Gourmet Garlic Gardens,
12300 FM 1176
Bangs, TX 76823 -
(325) 348 - 3049

[ Navigation Menu - Click these links to go to other pages on our website. ]
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[ Buy Garlic Here ] [ Artichoke Garlic ] [ Asiatic Garlic ] [ Creole Garlic ] [ Porcelain Garlic ] [ Purple Stripe Garlic ] [ Rocambole Garlic ] [ Silverskin Garlic ] [ Turban Garlic ] [ Buy samplers Here ]
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Our site is always being improved and updated. -- This page last updated April 12, 2014.

Our webpages have been visited over 3 million times since July of 1997 by people looking for the latest information about garlic and to buy the best gourmet garlics. Thank you one and all.
- Copyright 1997 through 2013, all rights reserved. -