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The Creole Garlics

Picture of Burgundy Garlic


Welcome to our Online Catalog.
Five ways to buy from the growers in our Farmers Market:

1. - If you know the name of the garlic you want to buy,
click here look it up in an alphabetical listing and click on the name of the one you want.
or
2. - If you don't know the name of the garlic you want to buy,
click here look it up in a list sorted by mild, medium and hot/strong
and click on the name of one that sounds good to you.
or
3. - If you just want a sampler assortment
click here buy a sampler assortment of several varieties.
and click on the name of one that sounds good to you.
or
4. - Click here to go to our farmers market and click on the picture
of a grower you feel good about and buy from them.
or
5.- Call Bob at (325) 348-3049

Order now for fall shipment.


Creole Garlics Table of Contents

[ Click these links to go to items on this page. ]


[ An overview of Creole garlics ] [ Aglio Rosso ] [ Ajo Rojo ] [ Burgundy ] [ Creole Red ] [ Cuban Purple ] [ Germinador ] [ Guatemalan ]
[ Labera Purple ] [ Morado Gigante ] [ Native Creole ] [ Pescadero Red ] [ Rose de Lautrec ] [ Spanish Benitee ]


Find out who your friends really are, eat garlic!


Caricature of a garlic plant.

Picture of some Creole garlics.

Overview of The Creole garlics

The Creole garlics are a unique and truly beautiful group of garlics that were cultivated in Spain and spread through the Conquistadores. They are utterly unlike the other garlics in appearance and clove configuration as well as color. Although they were formerly thought to be a sub-group of Silverskins, the latest DNA studies show them in a separate class by themselves.

They are downright gorgeous to look at and are one of the easiest eating raw garlics owing to a taste that is full but pleasantly warm rather than hot. They retain their flavor well when cooked. They have eight to twelve cloves per bulb arranged in a circular configuration. While the bulb wrappers are very white, the clove covers vary from a beautiful "red" rose color to dark purple and present a spectacular appearance. I regard them to be at least as beautiful as the porcelain garlics even though their configuration is very different, their colors are breathtaking.

Creoles are easily grown in southern climates and anywhere in USDA hardiness zones 7 through 10 and are much more tolerant of adverse weather conditions than most garlics. Creoles are not large garlics but they're hardy survivors and can grow where many other kinds can't.

They are ideal for California and the warm winter west coast as well as Texas and the Old South.

The story about our Creole garlics bears retelling. Over the years we have become one of the few sources of the rare and expensive Creole garlics because they grow better in the warm winter areas than they do in the colder North. We have slowly increased our holdings in these rare garlics which were developed in Spain and southern France over the centuries, rather than Italy or elsewhere; they were different altogether and they came in with the Spanish Conquistadores in the 1500s, hence the name Creole, which relates to the Carribbean.

As explained in earlier parts of our newsletter, we hit 100 degrees on April 15 one year, badly stunting our crop of rare Creoles and a few Artichokes. Our bulbs wound up being about 1/3 to 1/4 their usual size but almost all survived. We had accepted about a hund"red" orders of Creoles in anticipation of our usual large crop and offe"red" our customers an opportunity to cancel. Almost all said to go ahead and send those hardy little survivors, we want them anyway. They got a pretty good bargain because there were 2-3 times more bulbs in a pound this way and if you plant them early and leave them in the ground and extra week or two, they'll size back up in a couple of years and they'll have a lot more then. Everybody won. I wound up with some pretty good planting stock and will expect to have a much better crop in coming years.

We're in a similar situation now because our 2009-2010 crop endu"red" adverse growing conditions that resulted in small bulbs. Small bulbs of Creoles make for big opportunities that take two to three years to develop but when they do the benefits and the profits are substantial.

The bottom line to our Creole story is that regardless of the disasters that have befallen us, the hardy Creoles have survived, getting smaller in lean years and growing large and robust again with consecutive good growing seasons. It would be hard to ask much more from a beautiful and delicious long storing garlic that flavors food, has fabulous health benefits and can be worth a lot of money to those who grow it to good size by taking care of it.

It is my intention to cultivate an interest in people all across the Gulf coast, especially Louisiana and get them to grow these wonderful garlics not only for personal use but for profit as part of an economic rebirth in a area that sorely needs it. Why grow something that sells for $2/lb when with only a little extra effort you can grow something that sells for five to ten times that and have people lining up to buy it? I think that once some of those New Orleans chefs find out about these Creole garlics, they will create an even greater demand for them and people will have yet another reason to come to Louisiana and plan on spending some extra money on something they really like.

I also think that in the future the Creole garlics, currently almost unheard of in Louisiana, will become a very big part of Creole cooking and cuisine and part of the uniqueness of it all. Are you listening, Chef Emeril and all the other New Orleans chefs? Your future is calling. Creoles are among the rarest and most expensive of garlics and with the name of Creole, where but Louisiana would you expect them? The name might make you think they're grown there but they are not, it's just their name. If I do my job, they'll eventually be growing in profusion there and providing more economic opportunity for many as well as some great eating that you won't forget anytime soon.

We feel very fortunate to have any of these extremely rare treasures at all. Creoles are among the scarcest of all garlics.

Creoles are very rare garlics and we have sometimes had to ship smaller than prefer"red" sizes because small Creoles are better than no Creoles. We have saved the biggest and best for replanting and expect to have at least some good large Creole garlics.

The Creole Garlics of the South of France.

We had added the delightful garlics from the South of France to our collection but now will no longer be available this year . In the past we have had some of the rich tasting Rose du Lautrec and the pleasantly mild Germinador that we hope to be able to make available by the pound someday along with some Thermadrone (an Artichoke garlic) and Rose du Var (Silverskin).

our French Germinador garlic is in low supply but we hope to someday again grow them but we will have them again in a few years. The good news is that the Rose du Lautrec is surviving nicely and we may be able to include some of them in assortments this year. The weather has been pretty weird around here since the turn into the 21st century, alternating between drought and flooding but still our Creoles find some way to survive.

Back to Creole Garlics Table of Contents

Caricature of a garlic plant.






Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Picture of Silverskin garlic

Aglio Rosso -

A rich, musky mellow Garlic originally from southern Italy.

Harvests in early to mid summer - stores into spring.

Most garlics from southern Italy are white artichoke types but Aglio Rosso is a very red Creole garlic that stands out in lots of ways. The cloves are mostly of fairly uniform size

Finally, a great garlic from Italy that stores like a rock and grows well over most of the country, even in northern gardens but gets bigger in the south. It's one of the best choices for growing along the gulf coast.

Aglio Rosso ranks 6-8 on the garlickiness scale and 3-7 on the pungency side but gets hotter the longer it stores so it's milder in the fall medium in the winter and strong/hot in the spring. It has a rather rich, musky, earthy flavor and a noticeable bite, but is still on the light side most of the year but sharper in the spring.

- Order now for shipping in the fall.-

- We're sold out of Aglio Rosso for the season - Thank you for your business.

Order now for shipment in the fall.

Click on picture to enlarge.


Back to this page's Table of Contents

Caricature of a garlic bulb.





Caricature of a garlic plant.

Picture of some Creole garlics.


Ajo Rojo
A hotter, stronger Creole Garlic

Know where your food comes fromBuy Direct from our Growers below and Save.

Harvests early summer - stores through winter into midspring.

Ajo Rojo is almost "red", whereas Burgundy is almost purple. Everything else I just said about Burgundy applies to Ajo Rojo except that Ajo Rojo is usually more more pungent than Burgundy although some years it can be milder, depending on weather. The only other difference I can tell between them is that Ajo Rojo has bulb wrappers that are a little thicker and it seems to want to sprout and go back into the ground just a little earlier than Burgundy, so it doesn't seem to store quite as long but is just as clean. That is a little surprising as I would think that with thicker bulb wrappers it would store longer. That may be an aberration as the two were grown in different gardens with different types of soils and that may have made a difference. We'll continue to experiment with it and change our description if we get different experience next year.

Follow-up Report - It seems to depend on the weather. Some years Ajo Rojo will out-perform Burgundy and grow better and store longer. They seem to react a little differently to adverse weather and make a good combination to grow. Both varieties endure early season high heat and drought better than the average garlic. They were once called "Southern Continentals" for just this reason.


Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Order Ajo Rojo from these growers now for shipping in the fall.


Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Picture of Jeff and Billie Jean Westbrook of Gila Garlic. Picture of lovely young girl of LZ Farms in CA Picture of John and Yong Rueb and family of Forever Yong Farm in AZ. Picture of 
harvested garlic bulbs hanging in a barn.

Gila Garlic in NM
P. O. Box 379
Quemado, NM 87829
(575) 773-4300
E-mail - info@gilagarlic.com
GilaGarlic.com

LZ Garlic Farm
4348 Comanche Dr..
Bakersfield, CA, 93306
(661) 889-4111
jl820471@hotmail.com
LZFarms.com

Forever Yong Farm
HC 65, Box 6259
Amado, AZ 85645
(520) 398-8030
jyciaz@yahoo.com
ForeverYongFarm.com

Do you grow large, clean bulbs
of gourmet garlic organically?
E-Mail bob to see if you qualify
for our market.

Back to Creole Garlics Table of Contents





Caricature of a garlic plant.

Burgundy

Picture of some Creole garlics.

A richly flavorful with mellow pungency Creole garlic.
Harvests early summer - stores through winter into mid-spring.

Burgundy is as beautiful a garlic as the name implies. The Creole group may well be the most beautiful of all garlics for more than one reason. It was hard to believe Creoles were silverskins as they don't resemble any other silverskins in any way. Botanists assu"red" us; however, that they were genetically silverskins, but it turns out not to be so. They are in an class all of their own and it shows. If I have a personal favorite garlic, this one is it. I love so many of them it is hard to pick a single one, but I could not leave these beauties off any list of favorites. They look almost too pretty to eat-until you try one, then you realize they're too beautiful not to eat.

The bulb wrappers have a lovely deep rose color to them and the more layers you peel off, the prettier they get. When you finally get down to the cloves, which are arranged in circular fashion around the center, much like rocamboles, the clove covers are almost "red" with delicate burgundy colo"red" vertical streaks. They look more like flowers than garlic and are so perfectly arrayed that you are reluctant to pull off a clove and disturb the symmetry of it all. You almost feel as though you are violating it. But you have to taste test it so you pull off a clove and peel its cover off and take that first bite almost with a feeling of regret and apologizing to it for doing such violence to it. You bite off the upper half of the naked clove and fall in love with it as it tastes every bit as good as it looks. Burgundy has a wonderfully mild, yet full flavor with only moderate heat. In my view, it is one of the best of all garlics for enjoyable raw eating. It is so good that you eagerly rip off another clove and dig in without apology (Once is never enough with a garlic like this.)

Burgundy is about the size of the average silverskin and stores just as clean and firm almost as long, but not quite. Burgundy tends to grow clean also and seems almost immune to some of the problems that can plague some of the other varieties. That may be because Burgundy grows better in warmer climates than many kinds of garlic. Not all cultivars are well suited to growing in mild winter and warm to hot spring climates but the Creole garlics do very well here in central Texas and other warmer climates. The excellent condition of our original seedstock that we got from Filaree Farms in Washington implies that it does pretty good in the cold areas also. You might want to buy a handful of these garlics even if you hate garlic; they make a fabulous centerpiece for the festive table.


Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Picture of John and Yong Rueb and family of Forever Yong Farm in AZ. Picture of lovely young girl of LZ Farms in CA Picture of 
harvested garlic bulbs hanging in a barn.

Forever Yong Farm
HC 65, Box 6259
Amado, AZ 85645
(520) 398-8030
jyciaz@yahoo.com
ForeverYongFarm.com

LZ Garlic Farm
4348 Comanche Dr..
Bakersfield, CA, 93306
(661) 889-4111
jl820471@hotmail.com
LZFarms.com

Do you grow large, clean bulbs
of gourmet garlic organically?
E-Mail bob to see if you qualify
for our market.



Back to Creole Garlics Table of Contents





Caricature of a garlic plant.

Creole Red - A Rich Medium Creole garlic with a shallot-like flavor.

Picture of some Creole garlics.

Harvests in early summer - stores 7-8 months.

Creole Red is distinctively different from Burgundy and Ajo Rojo because of its unique shallot-like flavor and in that it sometimes has fewer cloves per bulb some years (The 2004 crop averaged five large, fat cloves per bulb). In the number of cloves, Creole Red is sometimes like the Porcelain garlics with few but really big cloves. They are striking to look at. As its name might imply, it grows quite well in southern climates.

Creole Red has a crisp and rich shallot-like flavor flavor and yet with enough pungency to let you know you're eating a real garlic but not so hot as to be painful. In a normal year I would say the flavor is about an 6 on a scale of 10 and the hotness rates about a 3. Creole Red is an excellent all-around garlic for raw or cooked use and stores well.




Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Click on their pictures to buy Creole Red from them.


Picture of Jeff and Billie Jean Westbrook of Gila Garlic. Picture of 
harvested garlic bulbs hanging in a barn.

Gila Garlic in NM
P. O. Box 379
Quemado, NM 87829
(575) 773-4300
E-mail - info@gilagarlic.com
GilaGarlic.com

Do you grow large, clean bulbs
of gourmet garlic organically?
E-Mail bob to see if you qualify
for our market.

Back to Creole Garlics Table of Contents





Caricature of a garlic plant.

Cuban Purple

Picture of some Creole garlics.

Harvests early summer - stores into spring.

- May not be available for 2013

Cuban Purple in most years is the darkest of the Creole garlics, being a distinctly purple color that can be almost a dusty "black"ish color at times. Cuban Purple is very consistent in size in that most of the bulbs will be of similar size with few extra large or extra small bulbs (commercial growers like that). Some years it will, like Creole Red, have only 4-6 very large dark purple cloves.

Taste = Wow! - Cuban Purple is a very rich, earthy garlicky flavor with very little pungency (hotness when raw) and that makes it an excellent garlic for raw eating and in pesto, salsa, etc. A hardy garlic that is great for growing in Florida and all along the Gulf Coast - California, too.

Caricature of a garlic bulb.

None of the growers in our farmers market currently have this cultivar for sale. If you grow this cultivar organically and wish to sell it in our online farmers market, please email me.bob@web-access.net

Back to Creole Garlics Table of Contents






Caricature of a garlic plant.

Germinador -- A mild French Creole. --

Picture of some Creole garlics.

May not be vailable for 2013

Germinador is a wonderful Creole garlic from the South of France. Germinador is nicely flavorful but has little or no pungency and so makes a delightful garlic for raw eating for those who love flavor but don't like hotness. Germinador is very impressively the longest storing of all the Creoles and Creoles are longer storing garlics than most. They're not very large garlics, but their flavor and long shelf life make them very much worth growing. Being a French Creole that is usually mild may make it an excellent garlic for French cuisine for those who want to cook with authentic ingredients.

It's difficult to describe its taste particularly since taste varies every year with weather and other growing conditions, but when I taste tested it, Germinador was so mild it was nearly bland and reminded me more of water chestnuts than garlic, but there was a subtle aura of garlic about the taste. Next year the taste may be stronger.

Caricature of a garlic bulb.

None of the growers in our farmers market currently have this cultivar for sale. If you grow this cultivar organically and wish to sell it in our online farmers market, please email me.bob@web-access.net

Back to Creole Garlics Table of Contents





Caricature of a garlic plant.

Rose de Lautrec --A Unique and Robust French Creole.--

Picture of some Creole garlics.

May not be vailable for 2013

Harvests early summer, stores into spring.

Many Americans who travel to the South of France for the cuisine fall in love with a beautiful garlic there called Rose du Lautrec and to their regret, they cannot find it when they return to the USA. Friends, we finally have some Rose de Lautrec and expect to have even more next year. Rose de Lautrec is a beautiful Creole that is almost as long storing as its fellow French Creole, Germinador but has a much more robust flavor.

Rose de Lautrec has a very unique flavor, I don't think I've ever tasted one quite like it. It has a modest amount of pungency, perhaps 3 or 4 on a scale of 10, so it is a warm garlic but not a hot one. Its flavor is what separates it from the others; It has a deep sort of muskiness but with an influence of dijon mustard or a hint of horseradish. It left me with the impression of a flat, wide yet deep flavor quite unlike any other garlic. One of these days, I have to see what it is like cooked. So many garlics, So little time...

Caricature of a garlic bulb.

None of the growers in our farmers market currently have this cultivar for sale. If you grow this cultivar organically and wish to sell it in our online farmers market, please email me.bob@web-access.net

Back to Creole Garlics Table of Contents







Caricature of a garlic plant.

Labera Purple

- May not be available in 2013

Labera Purple is an interesting Creole that has a nice pleasant garlickiness but with little ot no pungency for the first 20 to 30 seconds and then becomes very hot with a pungency of about 7.5 on a scale of 10 but it goes away after about 30 seconds leaving a very garlicky and still pungent aftertaste. A pleasantly surprising garlic.

It is much more pungent than Burgundy yet not as pungent as Ajo Rojo, which is quite hot. It has a pungency rating of about 7.5 on a scale of 10 and a garlickiness rating of about 4-5. Like all Creoles, it is a long storing garlic.
Harvest in late spring/early summer...stores well into spring.

Caricature of a garlic bulb.

None of the growers in our farmers market currently have this cultivar for sale. If you grow this cultivar organically and wish to sell it in our online farmers market, please email me.bob@web-access.net

Back to Creole Garlics Table of Contents







Caricature of a garlic plant.

Native Creole -- A hardy yet mellow Creole. --

Picture of some Creole garlics.

Order now for shipping in the fall.

Native Creole is a wonderful Creole garlic. Native Creole is nicely flavorful but has a delightful little bite of pungency and so makes a delightful garlic for raw eating for those who love flavor with a hint of pungency but don't like hotness. Native Creole is not only delightful to taste but it is one of the longest storing garlics of all the Creoles and Creoles are longer storing garlics than most. They're not always large garlics, but their flavor and long shelf life make them very much worth growing.

Buy direct from our growers and save.

Picture of Kent Knock with hisfriend Tom.

Order Native Creole now for shipment in the fall.



Back to Creole Garlics Table of Contents





Caricature of a garlic plant.

Pescadero Red (Fisherman's garlic)

- May not be available in 2013

Pescadero Red is an interesting Creole that has a nice pleasant garlickiness but only a little pungency. It is a little more pungent than Cuban Purple and not as pungent as Burgundy. It has a pungency rating of about 2 on a scale of 10 and a garlickiness rating of about 4. It is a mild, mellow garlic, great for pesto.

Pescadero Red is a very vigorous grower and can grow quite large. Like all Creoles, it is a long storing garlic.
Harvest in late spring/early summer...stores well into spring.

Caricature of a garlic bulb.

None of the growers in our farmers market currently have this cultivar for sale. If you grow this cultivar organically and wish to sell it in our online farmers market, please email me.bob@web-access.net

Back to Creole Garlics Table of Contents







Caricature of a garlic plant.
Spanish Benitee

- May not be available in 2013 -

Spanish Benitee is an interesting Creole that has a nice pleasant garlickiness but with some pungency. It is a lot more pungent than Burgundy and not as pungent as Ajo Rojo. This is a hot garlic when tasted raw. It has a pungency rating of about 8 or 9 on a scale of 10 and a garlickiness rating of about 6.

Like all Creoles, it is a long storing garlic.
Harvest in late spring/early summer...stores well into spring.

Caricature of a garlic bulb.

None of the growers in our farmers market currently have this cultivar for sale. If you grow this cultivar organically and wish to sell it in our online farmers market, please email me.bob@web-access.net

Back to Creole Garlics Table of Contents





That about completes our selection of Creoles for this season although we will probably have more of the above mentioned varieties in the next year or two as well as some other Creoles we are now growing. If we have some available, we'll put in detailed descriptions of them.

Readers who have been with us for a while will remember we are in the process of rebuilding our collection of garlics after a series of weather disasters that occurred as Landlady Nature kicked open the gates to the 21st century rather violently and our weather has been spotty at best in the past 12 years.

The first few years we had fabulous crops, but the past few years we have survived having no rain at all during the winter coupled with strong winds that blew for eight months without letup. Combine that with temperatures that alternated between the low teens and the high nineties in February and you have a recipe for disaster. The drought was relieved by a tornado with softball or cantalope size hail followed by heat waves and our harvests were over before they began. We have had 2 crops flooded and three now that have been eaten by plagues of grasshoppers. Yet, still we persist because we know our generous hostess will give us more good crops, too, in the fullness of time.

It has taken us a few years to rebuild our collection of Creoles. The Creoles have survived everything since the tornado of 2000 and finally we have a decent crop again. Next year it should be even bigger and better, that is, if it pleases the landlady, Her Imperial Majesty, Empress Nature. We have no doubt who is in charge out here.

The bottom line to our Creole story is that regardless of the disasters that have befallen us, the hardy Creoles have survived, getting smaller in lean years and growing large and robust again with consecutive good growing seasons. It would be hard to ask much more from a beautiful and delicious long storing garlic that flavors food, has fabulous health benefits and can be worth a lot of money to those who grow it to good size by taking care of it.

Back to Creole Garlics Table of Contents





Stylized caricature of a garlic plant.

- The information below is from gourmetgarlicgardens.com -
Please read.



Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Important notes for credit/debit card users:

This Farmers market is like your local farmers market. Each grower handles their own financial transactions.

When using your credit/debit card to buy direct from different growers, a separate order is required for each grower. You may buy as many different kinds of garlic as you want from any grower on any order but each grower requires a separate credit card transaction so that S & H charges may be properly calculated. If you want to order garlic from more than one grower, a separate payment must be made to each grower because they are independant businesses in different places.

Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Disclaimer

Each grower/vendor is responsible for their own garlic and prompt shipping to the buyer. Gourmet Garlic Gardens is not responsible for any garlic sent directly from any grower/vendor to any buyer Gourmet Garlic Gardens' total liability from all causes is limited to refunding any monies the buyer has paid directly to Gourmet Garlic Gardens.

Caricature of a garlic bulb.

Prices and availability of garlic subject to change without notice.

Caricature of a garlic bulb.



Caricature of a garlic bulb.

How Our Garlics are Grown

All the garlic for sale in our online farmers market was grown without the use of petrochemical pesticides, herbicides, or fertilizers; only natural and non-toxic fertilizers and pest control methods are used.

Some of our growers are Certified Organic and some are Certified Naturally Grown, which we regard as equal to Certified Organic in every meaningful way but without all the bureaucratic entanglements. All our farmers market growers grow organically and some are Certified Organic but not all want to be certified Organic because of the paperwork and reporting requirements and are among the best available sources of sustainable/ organic Garlic and they become Certified Naturally Grown, where the regulation comes from their fellow members rather than a federal bureacracy.

We do not allow growers who use synthetic petroleum-based fertilizers, pesticides, fungicides or herbicides to participate in our farmers market.

All garlic in our farmers market is grown in North America, no others allowed.
This farmers market is strictly for small-scale North American market gardeners/growers who live and grow sustainably.


Caricature of a garlic bulb.




Stylized caricature of a garlic plant.

We will be adding and deleting and changing the status of varieties often as our growers sell out of some and add more varieties so check back regularly to see what we currently list as available.
If you don't see what you want, check back again, we may have it later - we receive news about what's available from our growers continually. Or, E-Mail bob@web-access.net

Stylized caricature of a garlic plant.


Stylized caricature of a garlic plant.

- Garlic Books, Etc. -

Stylized caricature of a garlic plant.


Red line.

The Marriage of Mushrooms and Garlic

is the newest book about garlic and it is well-written and reads easy as the authors
have a warm friendly writing style that makes it fun to read and has some wonderful recipes.





Click here to read our review of The Marriage of Mushrooms and Garlic

by Chester Aaron and Malcolm Clark



Red line.

New - The Complete Book of Garlic is the best, most comprehensive book yet about garlic.

Book cover

The Complete Book of Garlic
by Ted Jordan Meredith

Stylized caricature of a garlic plant.

Red line.



The Classic Commercial Garlic Growers Guide

Ron's book cover

Growing Great Garlic
by Ron Engeland


Red line.

A Miscellany of Garlic

is the newest book about garlic and it is well-written and reads easy as the author has a warm friendly writing style that makes it fun to read.



Book cover

A Miscellany of Garlic

by Trina Clickner



Red line.

If you don't see what you want, E-Mail bob@web-access.net

Red line.


Stylized caricature of a garlic plant.

Basic Ordering Information


On any page of this website where the lists of garlic cultivars are displayed you can click on the name of any garlic and get a picture and/or a detailed description of that variety and some buttons you can click on to buy direct from different growers. Just decide how many pounds of which varieties you want from each grower and use your credit card to buy on line.

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Disclaimer

We make no guarantees or warranties of any kind whatsoever, expressed or implied, with respect to our garlic or the garlic sold by any growers who sell their garlic through our website. We do not guarantee or warrant the fitness, suitability or usability of our garlic for any particular purpose. We state only that the varieties we and the growers who sell through our website ship are to the best of our knowledge, the varieties we say they are. Any and all liability from all causes is limited to a refund of a customer's payment for the garlic in question.

We and the growers who sell through our website take great care to grow, harvest, cure and store our garlic properly and we will not knowingly ship garlic that is damaged, defective or diseased in any way we can see, feel or smell. We pack the garlic so as to minimize any probability of damage in shipment. If; however, you receive garlic that goes bad within 30 days, please call or e-mail the grower immediately stating the problem and return the defective garlic to the grower via Priority US Mail and the grower will either replace it at no additional charge, or refund your money for the defective garlic. It is our desire to provide our customers with the best garlic we can produce and enhance our reputation for excellence - but we cannot be held responsible for what happens after the garlic leaves our care.

All products are for sale to United States addresses only.


More TO COME...

Garlic Books, Garlic Accessories and Gardening Tools, Etc.


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 a very different red line.
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Pic of wildflowers around our ranch.

- Pictures of our Fabulous spring wildflowers some years. -

Stylized caricature of a garlic plant.

Bob Phillips' Texas Country Reporter did a story on me and the garlic for their long running TV program -
click here to see the 6:28 video on youtube:

Stylized caricature of a garlic plant.

 a very different red line.

Picture of the Garlicmeister playing his Indian flute.

Bob Anderson
Garlicmeister, a self-inflicted title for amusement only.
Photo courtesy of Bill Yeates.


Caricature of a garlic bulb.

If you would like to communicate with us, please send email to:
bob@web-access.net

Gourmet Garlic Gardens,
12300 FM 1176
Bangs, TX 76823 -
(325) 348 - 3049

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Our site is always being upgraded. -- This page last updated September 12, 2014.

Our webpages have been visited over 3 million times since July of 1997 by people looking for the latest information about garlic and to buy the best gourmet garlics. Thank you one and all.
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